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Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Wally Adeyemo was out promoting the positives of the Inflation Reduction Act in an apparent effort to counteract the messaging from Republicans who are working to abolish the law as well as to replace the IRS with a national sales tax.


The IRS has issued the luxury car depreciation limits for business vehicles placed in service in 2023 and the lease inclusion amounts for business vehicles first leased in 2023.


IRS has reminded eligible workers from low and moderate income groups to make qualifying retirement contributions and get the Saver’s Credit on their 2022 tax return. Taxpayers have until the due date for filing their 2022 return, that is April 18, 2023, to set up a new IRA or add money to an existing IRA for 2022. 


The IRS and Treasury have announced have released a list of clean vehicles that meet the requirements to claim the new clean vehicle tax credit, along with FAQs to help consumers better understand how to access the various tax incentives for the purchase of new and used electric vehicles available beginning January 1, 2023.


The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service have issued guidance pertaining to the new credit for qualified commercial clean vehicles, established by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 ( P.L. 117-169). Notice 2023-9 establishes a safe harbor regarding the incremental cost of certain qualified commercial clean vehicles placed in service in calendar year 2023.


The IRS announced a delay in reporting thresholds for third-party settlement organizations (TSPOs). As a result of this delay, third-party settlement organizations will not be required to report tax year 2022 transactions on a Form 1099-K to the IRS or the payee for the lower, $600 threshold amount enacted as part of the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 ( P.L. 117-2).


The IRS has notified taxpayers of the applicable reference standard required to be used to determine the amount of the energy efficient commercial building (EECB) property deduction allowed under Code Sec. 179D as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA) ( P.L. 117-169). 


The Treasury Department and the IRS have provided guidance announcing that they intend to issue proposed regulations to address the application of the new one-percent corporate stock repurchase excise tax under Code Sec. 4501, which was added by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 ( P.L. 117-169).


With the transition of leadership from Democrats to Republicans in the House of Representatives comes new rules that legislators must adhere to, and they could have implications on tax policy.


Despite a significant number of challenges faced by taxpayers in 2022, National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins has reason to be more optimistic for 2023.

"We have begun to see the light at the end of the tunnel," Collins wrote in the 2022 annual NTA report to Congress, released on January 11, 2023. "I’m just not sure how much further we have to travel before we see sunlight."


The 2016 filing season has closed with renewed emphasis on cybersecurity, tax-related identity theft and customer service. Despite nearly constant attack by cybercriminals, the IRS reported that taxpayer information remains secure. The agency also continued to intercept thousands of bogus returns and prevent the issuance of fraudulent refunds.


Passage of the “Tax Extenders” undeniably provided one of the major headlines – and tax benefits – to come out of the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act), signed into law on December 18, 2015. Although these tax extenders (over 50 of them in all) were largely made retroactive to January 1, 2015, valuable enhancements to some of these tax benefits were not made retroactive. Rather, these enhancements were made effective only starting January 1, 2016. As a result, individuals and businesses alike should treat these enhancements as brand-new tax breaks, taking a close look at whether one or several of them may apply. Here’s a list to consider as 2016 tax planning gets underway now that tax filing-season has ended.


The IRS always urges taxpayers to pay their current tax liabilities when due, to avoid interest and penalties. Taxpayers who can’t pay the full amount are urged to pay as much as they can, for the same reason. But some taxpayers cannot pay their full tax liability by the normal April 15 deadline (April 18th in 2016 because of the intersection of a weekend and a District of Columbia holiday).


Yes, the IRS can impose penalties if a tax return is not timely filed or if a tax liability is not timely paid. As with all IRS penalties, the rules are complex. However, a taxpayer may avoid a penalty if he or she shows reasonable cause.


The IRS expects to receive more than 150 million individual income tax returns this year and issue billions of dollars in refunds. That huge pool of refunds drives scam artists and criminals to steal taxpayer identities and claim fraudulent refunds. The IRS has many protections in place to discover false returns and refund claims, but taxpayers still need to be proactive.


There are three main types of IRS audits: correspondence audits, office audits, and field audits (listed in order of increasing invasiveness). Correspondence audits are initiated (and generally conducted) by postal mail. Office audits require a taxpayer and/or its representative to appear in an IRS office; and a field audit involves IRS examiners paying a visit to the taxpayer's place of business.


Employers and other organizations must obtain an employer identification number (EIN) to identify themselves for tax administration purposes, such as starting a new business, withholding taxes on wages, or creating a trust. Entities apply for an EIN by filing IRS Form SS-4. Page two of the form advises whether an applicant needs an EIN.